rhamphotheca:

Brain Evolution by Dwayne Godwin and Jorge Cham
(via: Scientific American magazine)

rhamphotheca:

Brain Evolution by Dwayne Godwin and Jorge Cham

(via: Scientific American magazine)

(via sagansense)

spaceplasma:

Two Solar Flares

The sun emitted a significant solar flare on June 10, 2014. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory - which typically observes the entire sun 24 hours a day — captured images of the flare.

This flare is classified as an X2.2 flare. X-class denotes the most intense flares, while the number provides more information about its strength. An X2 is twice as intense as an X1, an X3 is three times as intense, etc.

About one hour later, the sun released a second X-class flare. This is classified as an X1.5 flare.

Credit: NASA, SDO

(via sagansense)

spaceplasma:


A stream of plasma burst out from the Sun, but since it lacked enough force to break away, most of it fell back into the Sun (May 27, 2014).
The GIF/movie combines two wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light, and covers a little over two hours. Minor eruptions like this one occur almost daily, representing the dynamic activity driven by powerful magnetic forces near the Sun’s surface.

Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory/NASA

spaceplasma:

A stream of plasma burst out from the Sun, but since it lacked enough force to break away, most of it fell back into the Sun (May 27, 2014).

The GIF/movie combines two wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light, and covers a little over two hours. Minor eruptions like this one occur almost daily, representing the dynamic activity driven by powerful magnetic forces near the Sun’s surface.

Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory/NASA

(via sagansense)

neuromorphogenesis:

How Big Is The Brain? Here’s Some Perspective.

Chris Whittaker and Laura White of Ashfield Healthcare Communications, and Craig Armstrong of CreativeFusion used a metaphor approach that put them in first place. They scaled the human brain all the way up to the scale of the world and described the size the structures of the brain would be at that size. This brings the tiniest brain structures into a scale we can all relate to. This approach combined with a crisp, clean style, does a great job of clearly explaining the scale of the human brain.

Some of the runners up are pretty impressive, too.

futurist-foresight:

A look at our new nanotech selves.
futurescope:

How Nanotechnology Could Reengineer Us
from Keithly:

Nanotechnology is an important new area of research that promises significant advances in electronics, materials, biotechnology, alternative energy sources, and dozens of other applications. The graphic below illustrates, at a personal level, the potential impact on each of us. And where electrical measurement is required, Keithley instrumentation is being used in an expanding list of nanotechnology research and development settings.

[source]

futurist-foresight:

A look at our new nanotech selves.

futurescope:

How Nanotechnology Could Reengineer Us

from Keithly:

Nanotechnology is an important new area of research that promises significant advances in electronics, materials, biotechnology, alternative energy sources, and dozens of other applications. The graphic below illustrates, at a personal level, the potential impact on each of us. And where electrical measurement is required, Keithley instrumentation is being used in an expanding list of nanotechnology research and development settings.

[source]

futurist-foresight:

Wireless power induction could revolutionize medical treatments.

txchnologist:

Could New Wireless Power Transfer Unleash Electric Medicine?

Stanford University engineers say they have figured out a way to wirelessly send electric power deeper into the body than ever before.

Inventor and electrical engineering assistant professor Ada Poon created a near-field power transmitter like those used to recharge wireless toothbrushes in their cradle. The difference is that hers uses tissue between the transmitter and medical device implanted in the body to amplify the electromagnetic waves. Her team then created an electrode and receiver unit about the size of a grain of rice that can be placed wherever electrical stimulation is required.

Read more and see the video below.

Read More

neuromorphogenesis:

The Science of Happiness: What data & biology reveal about our mood

While true happiness may have a different definition to each of us, science can give us a glimpse at the underlying biological factors behind happiness. From the food we eat to room temperature, there are thousands of factors that play a role in how our brains work and the moods that we are in. Understanding these factors can be helpful in achieving lasting happiness.

Infographic by Webpage FX

humanoidhistory:

A fresh, new crater has been found on Mars.

weareallstarstuff:

Technicolour Alaska by Alexis Coram

(via sagansense)